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Haitian Traditions


pranplezi
(@pranplezi)
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Traditions exist in every aspect of life: national, historical, biblical, religious, cultural, etc. They were created by our ancestors, who then have passed them to the next generation.

Which tradition(s) in your household you deem worthy of being preserved?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ChMgfEXzhY

 

Tradisyon Ayisyèn

Tradisyon egziste nan tout aspè nan lavi: nasyonal, istorik, biblik, relijye, kiltirèl, etc. Yo te kreye pa zansèt nou epi ki pase yo bay lòt jenerasyon.

Ki tradisyon nan kay ou ke ou jije ki merite prezève?


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Tifi_led
(@tifi_led)
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Instead of tradition, my answers would best be categorized under " norms". 

Personal greetings are very important to Haitians. Depending on your age, gender or state of mind, when entering a room you are expected to greet each person in that room whether by a kiss, a handshake or a simple "bonswa" 

When entering a "Lakou" the visitor will shout out a " onè" and the host if home, is expected to answer by a "respè". The host usually offers its visitors coffee with bread. 
Since I no longer reside in Haiti the "onè/respè to me is irrelevant but I am a big fan of courtesy. My family is indeed expected to greet others accordingly. 


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eztek
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Being courteous is not a Haitian thing. One/Respe is a form of greeting that Haitians use. It is no different from good morning/good day. I do not consider that as a tradition or a norm. 

Pa antre nan on fanmi ki gen volo, I would consider a Haitian tradition. Then again, if you look at it deeper, many of these so called traditions are not observed by Haitians only.


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Tifi_led
(@tifi_led)
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True it is universal but as Haitian our parents or should I say my parents would give me the beating of my life if I did not greet a relative, friend appropriately. 

Another thing I now remember how Haitians blessed their new house or every New Year. My mom every year (end of December)  would do a deep cleaning (fresh paint wash all the curtains, sheets, clothes) Janvye a pa dwe vinn jwenn nou ak rad sal. And oh not to forget the mopping of the floor with fey and simaye lajan ( mostly loose change), rice, beans in all the corners of the house, for there would be always food and money in the house. 

Other countries have their  own tradition, such when I had my first house warming gift, a friend of the family brought us a basket of Bread (that the house may never know hunger) Salt (that it may always have flavor) Wine (brings joy and prosperity) Honey ( forgot what the honey was good for 🤣 It was new to my usual pinch of salt in the corner to cast off evil and bring protection ( my great grandmother) 😎 😎 

This post was modified 2 years ago by Tifi_led

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eztek
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I am pretty sure these are borrowed too. If you visited Africa or other part of the world, you would have found the same.

This post was modified 2 years ago by eztek

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Believe
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@tifi_led

You share some traditions that are quite interesting. Proper greeting has been a custom in many families (if not all). I giggle at your parents' reaction for not greeting a relative or an adult appropriately. Other parents would have had similar reaction.

 

Ou pataje kèk tradisyon ki byen enteresan. Se yon koutim nan anpil fanmi ayisyen (si se pa tout) pou timoun salye lòt paran e granmoun. Mwen ri de reyaksyon paran ou dèske ou pa salye lòt moun kòmsadwa. Lòt paran te kapab aji menm jan.


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eztek
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ou pat leve ayiti believe? se konsa li ye tout kote, tout paran ka vannenw ak danno siw pa salye granmoun


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